Why You Shouldn’t Eat Egg Beaters + Recipe

I am an intuitive eater and do not label myself vegan, vegetarian, pescatarian, etc.  I have used those labels to describe my diet at various points throughout my health journey in the past, however, I do not use them anymore. Yes, I eat 80% of my food raw and go weeks and weeks without consuming any animal products. But there are times when I know I need certain cooked whole foods in my diet to balance my overall well being and provide the nutrients I feel my body needs.

One of the things that I like to include in my diet is the occasional egg.  I usually like to eat them for dinner vs. for breakfast because I like to start my days with a lighter meal.

Local pastured raised organic eggs are a must. You don’t want your eggs to be full of antibiotics and from chickens who ate genetically modified corn. Nor, do you want to purchase eggs from chickens that are being raised in crowded hen houses with no light and horrible conditions.  I truly believe you consume not just the food you are eating but the energy from it too. You should want nothing but positive energy entering your body!

Check out these happy chickens I met in Bali – Cockadoodle doooooo!

Eggs are pretty incredible for you and offer your body a lot of nutrition in one little dose. The sulfur in them is great for your hair and nails.  Eggs contain Vitamin D & B12 which is often insufficient in vegan diets.  Lutein is a compound found in eggs that prevent many types of cancers and heart disease, as well as protect your eyes from cataracts. And last by not least – eggs contain a nutrient called lecithin that helps your body break down fat.

To get all these benefits- you must consume the whole egg!  Remember whole foods = the whole egg! Do not consume pre-made cartons of egg whites – those products lose many of their nutrients during processing.

And PLEASE NO Egg beaters – they are just pure processed crap – check out the ingredient list:

Egg Whites, Less than 1%: Natural FlavorColor (Includes Beta Carotene), Spices, Salt, Onion Powder, Vegetable Gums (Xanthan Gum, Guar Gum), Maltodextrin. Vitamins and Minerals: Calcium Sulfate, Iron (Ferric Phosphate), Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol Acetate), Zinc Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B1 (Thiamine Mononitrate), Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine Hydrochloride), Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin D3

The ingredient “natural flavor” is an industry secret that allows companies to sneak in MSG without labeling it. Both, xanthan gum (a thickener) and maltodextrin (a processed sugar) are made from genetically modified corn. Why do you need those ingredients in your eggs? Because they took out the yolk, which also took out all the REAL natural flavor, thickness and nutrients, that’s why. They even had to add back in vitamins to compensate. Don’t be fooled by this nonsense!

Ok enough preaching… hopefully to the choir

:)

Here’s a great recipe to make when hectic days arrive – especially with the holiday season right around the corner!  This fast frittata is a warm satisfying dish and very easy to make!


4.0 from 4 reviews
Food Babe’s Fast Frittata
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 2-4
Ingredients
  • 4 whole eggs
  • 1 large red pepper diced
  • 1 small red onion diced
  • 1 to 2 ounces of goat cheese (optional)
  • 3 sun dried tomatoes diced (dry not packed in oil)
  • 3 tbsp minced fresh basil
  • ¼ tsp red pepper flakes
  • ¼ tsp paprika
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • fresh cracked black pepper
  • ½ tsp coconut oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to broil on high
  2. Heat coconut oil in a large skillet on medium heat
  3. Once pan is heated, sauté red onion for about 3 mins, then add red pepper and sauté another 3-5 mins until just tender but not completely cooked through
  4. While vegetables are cooking, in a large bowl combine whole eggs, basil and spices and whisk together for 1 min
  5. Pour mixture into pan, distributing the mixture evenly over the vegetable sauté
  6. Top mixture with crumbles of goat cheese and sun dried tomatoes (optional)
  7. Allow frittata to cook for a few mins on the stove top (cooking the bottom slightly) before placing pan into oven
  8. Broil on high for 7-12 mins – watch carefully to make sure it doesn’t burn
  9. Remove from oven once top is slightly browned and cool for 5 mins
  10. Cut into slices and serve with a mixed greens dressed with an aged balsamic vinegar – The flavors will be perfect together!
Notes
Tip – To make more servings, just double the recipe using the same pan ***Please buy all organic ingredients if possible***

Red Onion and Red PepperRed Onion and Red Pepper in the panCooking in PanBig Slice with some Greens

I had a hectic today day – All I ended up having for dinner tonight was a big glass of fresh green juice that included fresh rainbow chard, celery, cucumber, cilantro, ginger, lemon and garlic + a nice bowl of superfood travel mix (recipe for that coming soon).

After sharing this recipe now, I wish I had made this instead

:)

Let me know if you have any questions or comments – I love hearing from you!

Do you know someone who is still using Egg Beaters? Please share this post with them so they can get clued in.

Bok! Bok!,

Food Babe

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43 Responses to “Why You Shouldn’t Eat Egg Beaters + Recipe”

  1. Kristen

    I’m confused. The instructions list both whole eggs and egg whites, but the ingredients don’t include egg whites. Did I miss something?

    Reply
    • Martha (to Kristen)

      I don’t see where it says egg white in the recipe, but in the picture you can see the egg sitting in the cracked egg like she did separate the whites from the yolk. Confusing…

      Reply
    • tina (to Kristen)

      I don’t see egg whites in the instructions but it looks like via the picture that she used two whole eggs and the other two, she used just the whites. I often do this to lighten things up a bit without using all egg whites. A little bit goes a long way. I’m also assuming using at least some yolk helps thicken it up a bit. Not sure. :)

      Reply
  2. Assistant to Food Babe (Krista)

    Hi Kristen – it is just 4 whole eggs – not sure where it says egg whites. Good luck!

    Reply
  3. Joe

    What about Egglands Best Liquid Egg Whites? They only have 1 ingredient, egg whites.

    Reply
    • heather (to Joe)

      I’d like to know this, as well!

      Reply
    • Jan Love (to Joe)

      I would like to know this , too!

      Reply
    • Brandon (to Joe)

      “To get all these benefits- you must consume the whole egg! Remember whole foods = the whole egg! Do not consume pre-made cartons of egg whites – those products lose many of their nutrients during processing.”

      Reply
  4. Jamie@SoyMilkMustache

    I’m so glad you wrote this article! For a long time, I only ate egg whites so that I could get lots of protein without many calories. It’s true that that’s what you get, but you also waste so many eggs and deprive yourself of great nutrients!

    Now I’m an avid whole-egg eater. My family has a farm with lots of happy chickens so I load up on as many eggs as I can when I visit. In between visits, when I have to buy eggs, I’ll always pay extra for organic cage-free or free-range. I mean, really, it costs about $4 for the good eggs, which is significantly more than the $1.50 non-organic caged-chicken eggs, BUT $4 is so little to pay for so much high-quality food!

    Reply
    • Assistant to Food Babe (Krista) (to Jamie@SoyMilkMustache)

      I agree it is so worth the price for good local farm eggs from happy chickens!

      Reply
  5. Mike

    More confusion for me. Does skillet=pan. The whole cooking process is done in the original skillet? I’m new to cooking.

    Reply
    • Assistant to Food Babe (Krista) (to Mike)

      Hi Mike – yes skillet and pan are the same – it is all done in one skillet/pan. Just make sure it is oven safe because it has to go under the broiler. Good luck! Hope you try it…

      Reply
  6. Lyndal

    That recipe reminds me of the Turkish Menemen recipe I ate whilst backpacking. Mmm- delicious!!

    Reply
  7. Brandon

    Sure do love your goat cheese, it’s in every recipe :) Yuk

    Reply
  8. Leigh M

    Have you heard of the issues with Olive Oil (even Organic) being BLENDS of oils rather than 100% Olive Oil?! How do I know if mine is real?! (I currently have Spectrum Organic EVOO).

    Reply
    • Kathleen (to Leigh M)

      I have a soy allergy, so I have encountered that same issue many times. I always read the ingredients on the back of bottle when buying, and sadly must refuse to eat at restaurants that fry in soybean oil (or won’t list what kind of oil they use, simply saying ‘fryer oil.’)

      Reply
  9. GMO? NoNoNO!!!

    Try John Greek! It’s awesome!!!

    Reply
  10. Liesel

    Classic … Real vs. the Substitute. I’d much rather eat the non-organic real egg as opposed to “Egg-Beaters” any day! I remember having this conversation just after college (I’m now 46). My boyfriend and I (and may of our friends) were vegetarian but his roommate was not. The roommate asked about butter vs. margarine. My answer, always go with what’s real. Butter is real, margarine is so not real. Yes, butter has more calories an higher in fat, but as long as you have it in moderation … at least you’re eating something real. Same goes for Egg-Beaters. It’s not an egg, but some failed version of an egg. I’ve lived with that motto all my life. Now as a wife and mother, I certainly keep that alive in my house and teach our son about what’s good for you. Granted my father was a dairy-man, and by that I mean he trained in Switzerland as a cheese-maker (as well as all dairy items). I could never have gone the fake route, especially dairy. And this is why I can’t go vegan.

    Reply
    • Veronica (to Liesel)

      Butter and margarine are both 100% fat. Every gram of butter or margarine has 9 calories. Butter is NOT higher in fat. Higher in saturated fat yes… but give me saturated fat over margarine’s transfat any day of the week!

      Reply
  11. Ken

    Just stumbled across this but and some great information but I think a couple of things need to be cleared up. First, only ‘Original’ Egg Beaters has anything more than just egg whites in it. (99% egg whites, 1% for the other) Egg Beaters %100 egg whites is exactly that..-100%- whites with nothing else added. Now, how Egg Beaters sources their eggs, I’m still looking into that. I’m a huge fan of eggs but due to cholesterol issues, I only allow myself one whole egg a day. (Preferable free range and cage free) This is where Egg Beaters %100 comes in: I usually like to eat more than just one egg…so I use one whole egg and then add egg whites to get the desired portion and I have been doing this for years with great success. I use both Egg Beaters 100% egg whites mostly but sometimes I will crack eggs and separate the yolk if I’m in the mood. At any rate, that’s my 2 cents and I hope that helps. One thing I would also like to punctuate before ending this… the ingredients for Original Egg Beaters as listed in this blog is missing the %99 for the egg whites themselves. At first glance, someone might assume after reading this blog that Original Egg Beaters might contain less than 1% egg whites. Not to imply that ‘Food Babe’ did this intentionally but I think it should be corrected. Btw, I do not work for Conagra Foods, nor have I been paid to post this. :)

    Reply
  12. Melissa

    Better than chicken eggs… duck eggs!

    Reply
  13. Sarah

    LOVE IT!! I was JUST going off on a guy at my gym for trying to tell me that egg beaters are healthy! They just are another dumb “food” invention!
    I will be sending this article along :) Thank you for the information, once again.

    Reply
  14. Kathleen

    I know someone who only eats the yolk, haha.

    It’s such a huge waste of eggs though. The only time I use egg whites is if it’s in a recipe for baking, but then I usually cook the yolks up and eat them separately.

    I simply do not understand why this product exists, or why they even have to add ingredients. I seriously think you fail at being a human being if you have to buy pre-separated eggs, in a carton, with spices already mixed in. It’s not difficult to separate eggs, scramble them, and add spices. Egg whites have about as much flavor as water anyway, so why would you do it? This is on the same level as buying pre-sliced apples.

    Reply
    • Liesel (to Kathleen)

      Kathleen – I think you answered your own question as to why a person would buy pre-separated eggs on same level as pre-sliced apples … Convenience. Not necessarily convenient for your body, but a suppose it saves a few minutes. Better for me or saving time … Hmmm, I’ll make the extra effort to separate my own eggs (should a recipe call for that) and slicing my own apples. Sounds like you’re on the same page too.

      Reply
      • Kathleen (to Liesel)

        Yes, definitely on the same page here.

        I feel, however, our culture has developed to the point where we feel as though there’s not enough time in the day. Everything must be done quickly and efficiently, and we must get everything NOW. It took several years for me to break this own pattern myself, and now my body feels much better changing to a whole food diet (specifically paleo for me).

        I did not think this way in college. I was overloaded with stuff to do, work, school, etc. and did not want to take the time to cook. I purchased processed foods like boxed Kraft, hot dogs, Ramen, Kool Aid anything cheap and easy really. My eggs were also the cheap ones, if I ever got around to actually cooking breakfast (usually cereal and rice milk). I felt like cr@p all the time, and it was a downward spiral: I was constantly busy, constantly tired, making myself more tired, making my work less efficient, so I felt even more busy…

        After college, I took a step back to evaluate my health and lifestyle. I was tired of being tired all the time, tired of being bloated. I went in for food allergy testing, and turns out I was allergic to several things I ate on a regular basis. This kind of sparked something in me that made me want to go whole food (I had so many allergies, I started reading ingredients, and finding out what was in the food. And I stopped buying ‘mystery’ food with ‘natural flavoring’ because I didn’t know what it was). Now I am the person who gets seriously disturbed when I pick up a bag of pre-shredded mozzarella in the store, and wonder why there’s more than just ‘milk’ in the ingredients.

        This is turning into a long story, but the point being: I don’t think people will stop being moronic lazy failures until something drastic happens to them, to make them step back and think “wow, this is really not something I want to put in my body!” And it truly is saddening, but if the stereotypical college kid can realize it, I think anyone can.

    • Vicky (to Kathleen)

      That is such a great comment! I don’t understand why we buy “separated” food either. Except that the food industry has manipulated us and addicted us with the garbage labeled “food.” Eat the whole thing as nature made it, in moderation and all will be well.

      Reply
    • Lisa (to Kathleen)

      I buy bottled egg whites because I’m allergic to egg yolk. I could seperate them out, but a lot of the time some yolk gets in and I have to trash the whole thing. I buy their %100 egg whites, nothing added, and it’s been a god send for me.

      Reply
  15. Monika

    Hi
    While I totally agree on your post, and feel eating eggs from chooks that are allowed to roam free etc is a must (we have our own chooks that we get eggs from) I have to say your picture of the chickens/roosters from Bali may not be happy chooks….the basket next to them holds them before they are released to fight, because they are use in Cock Fighting. It is a common practice and ‘game’ over there to have these fights and gamble on them. Sad but true. :(

    Reply
  16. Donna

    I used to be a HUGE Egg-Beaters fan.. ate loads of it in addition to ‘Breakfast Farms’ items – thinking it was REALLY GOOD for me .. ha! Nope.. not anymore. I only buy BROWN ORGANIC FREE-RANGE eggs at my supermarket.. yes, they are costly about $4 or more a dozen but worth every penny in my opinion.. :)

    Reply
  17. Paul

    “Cage free” and “free range” don’t mean anything, there still in large hen houses and may never get outside. Plus there “100% vegetarian” feed is not what we want that’s loaded w/ gmo corn and soy. You need to get pasture raised eggs, which means the hens are outside for the majority and are able to eat bugs and whatever their natural diet is, not this grain and soy diet that they’re given… There’s a small farm by me that sells pasture raised eggs but they’re $6.50 a dozen. Long story short I can’t afford them:(

    Reply
  18. Kenneth

    May I offer a suggestion, I know that coconut oil is really great for you, but there are people, (my wife) who have severe allergies to nut oils. Perhaps putting an alternative, like grape seed, or sunflower oil. Also refined “light” olive oil is good for you too! Other than that, I will definitely try your recipe (with the coconut oil omitted of course.)

    Reply
  19. Susan Marston

    Thanks a million Vani, you are always blowing my mind with the hidden truths behind the food I used to eat,you’re hard work is appreciated!!

    Reply
  20. bulldurham48

    I have been eating egg beaters(egg whites} for around 18 years now and I have not grown any horns or scales. I still eat rel eggs in a limited way, 1 time about every 2 weeks. My blood pressure was 112/70 when taken 2 hours ago. My cholesterol levels, both good and bad are great as are my triglycerides. Granted I watch what I eat and do not smoke. I am 65 years old and had a heart attack in 1990, without any bad damage. My cardio doctor takes good care of me and put me on my current diet that includes the “evil” eggbeaters. I am doing great. Eggs taste great, are fun to eat, but like alot of good things, if you do not use real moderation, they will clog your system up and screw you up, I know, ate eggs every am and when ever I could. Now years later and smarter I am still here. Eggbeaters are good for you, try them your heart will love you for it.

    Reply
  21. EggBeaterBoy

    Uh, Egg Beaters are 99% egg whites and LESS THAN 1% of the named ingredients. They are gluten-free, pasteurized, and GOOD FOR YOU. I’m gonna drink a whole gallon of it right now. BOOM.

    Reply
  22. Beaktime

    I eat 4-5 eggs every day, the whole egg and nothing but the egg. I go out in my backyard and grab them from the chicken nest, thank my hens and cook them up. My doctor says I am the healthiest patient he has. Considering how unhealthy everyone in the country is, I do not get much solace from it but it gives me a smile. My cholesterol is perfect and I feel great so eat up fresh eggs and avoid the processed eggbeaters.

    Reply
  23. Merry

    After making my Egg Beaters w/fresh spinach, I decided to google how Food Babe felt about them. Yes, I was eating them whilst reading! Well, it didn’t take me long to put them aside and feel disgusted! I can hardly wait to try your frittata! No more Egg Beaters for me. P.S. I just watched a Dr. Oz on the benefits of the WHOLE egg!

    Reply
  24. Shannon

    Yesterday a couple friends & I met at IHOP for lunch. Two of us ordered the bacon & cheese omelet. When it arrived fortunately they’d forgotten the bacon and the cheese was just tossed on top instead of being melted inside the omelet. Their mistakes turned out to be a good thing because it enabled me to see & taste solely the omelet.

    The omelet not only didn’t look quite right but it didn’t taste right either. It didn’t taste like eggs! A light went on in my head. Could this be what I think it is? Fake eggs? I took a couple more bites, pushed it aside and called over the waitress. I told her it tasted awful and I couldn’t eat it.

    She lowered her voice and told us that at IHOP when someone orders an omelet or scrambled eggs THEY USE EGG BEATERS!! I was floored. She said you have to specifically as to have an omelet made with real eggs cracked from the shell. So, we asked. She took the offending egg beater’s omelets away and a few minutes later returned with omelets made from real eggs.

    Whoever would think that the day had come that when ordering an omelet you’d have to request it be made with real eggs!

    Reply
  25. Charles

    Taking a soapbox stance in regards to eggs is not a cookie cutter answer for everyone. As an RN, I support the holistic approach to health. I have studied nutrition along with herbal treatments and remedies with their health and nutritional value. A large portion on people of the western society should be consuming little to no egg yokes because of the high cholesterol content, whether organic or not. Those who prefer separating yoke from whites for a healthier alternative, more power to you. I will stick to my egg beaters (or other brand products) not only for the convenience but also because I find only a negligible difference between packaged egg white products and separating the white and yoke myself.
    However, my choice to use packaged products goes beyond reducing my cholesterol. 15 years ago, over a period of one week, I became highly allergic to egg yokes. The reaction I have is anaphylactic so i will never be able to eat a traditional egg again.
    I have observed many take an extremist approach to dietary change but usually fail. Intake is just like any other learned habit, it must be changed over time and in manageable steps. Intake is not the only area that one should modify if you are looking to improve your health. To change your diet but continue to smoke and consume alcohol is the futile attempt to getting your cake and eating too. A dietary change will not offset the damage imposed with smoking or alcohol.

    Reply
  26. Joe

    I feel like people are getting the wrong idea from this blog, commenting that the egg beaters are ‘fake’ eggs. They’re not. They’re 99 percent real egg whites. They ARE good for you, and as Charles said above, many people have a cholesterol problem or are eating too much fat. Egg beaters are a great way to cut down on that but still give you a protein fix. If you stir fry veggies like peppers, scallions and spinach, then lower the heat to medium and pour the egg beaters over the veggies, you can scramble them up and it makes for some mean yummy scrambled eggs. I like to have them with hot sauce. Helped me lose a lot of fat, too.

    Reply
    • Ludwig (to Joe)

      I feel like you are getting the wrong idea…the label Food Babe copied clearly says that less than 1% of the following, before listing the laundry list of added ingredients. So while it might be a negligible percentage, I’d still rather avoid preservatives, MSG, lab-concocted vitamins (vs. say whole-food based) in what is still an egg substitute. Barring egg yolk allergies, give me the actual egg every time.

      Reply
  27. Jonathan Russo

    I agree with those supporting egg beaters. Also I would like to add that Xanthum gum is not made from corn as stated, most is produced from whey byproduct in milk or cheese production. Many people give food additives a bad reputation because they are not natural, however almost all come from natural foods and are safe to consume in the amounts intended. MSG is not inherently bad for you, not does it cause reactions in 99% of the population. It is a natural salt found in large amounts natural foods like Parmesan cheese, tomatoes, seaweed, and any type of meat. Flawed studies were conducted, unfortunatly giving msg a bad reputation. The fact is, it is alright in moderation, just like normal sodium chloride is. As a graduate student in food science, I know what should and shouldn’t be consumed and live a very healthy life.

    Reply

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